Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The brown marmorated stink bug, is a plant pest that was recently introduced into the United States from its native range in Japan, Korea, and China. Reported host plants in the United States include the following: fruit crops, agronomic crops, vegetable crops, ornamental trees and shrubs. For more information, please click “read more”.

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Hands on Gardening- Earwigs

Watch this week’s Hands on Gardening to learn what you can do to get earwigs out of your garden and home. To view this episode, click “read more”.

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Promethea Moth

Promethea Moth

This moth has a wing spread of 2.5 to four inches, the females averaging a little larger than the males. The female promethea resembles the cecropia to some extent although it is much smaller. Both have an eye spot near the tip of the front wing and a white mark near the middle of each wing. However, the female promethea is a richer red-brown than the cecropia; the male promethea is dark brown to nearly black and lacks the white marks. The male also has the unusual habit, for a saturniid, of flying in the late afternoon. The rest of the saturniids are only active after dark. To view the full publication, click “read more”.

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Rose Chafer Beetle

Skeletonizing of the leaves of roses, raspberries, grapes, fruit trees, and many other cultivated trees and shrubs may be caused by the adult rose chafer, Macrodactylus subspinosus (Fabricius). Adult beetles are attracted to flower blossoms, particularly roses and peonies. Damage occurs in June and tends to be most severe in areas of light sandy soil, which is preferred by the larvae. Heavy of clay soils hamper rose chafer growth and development. Click “read more” to view the factsheet.

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Confirmation of Emerald Ash Borer in La Crosse County

Details of Latest Confirmation: Six beetles were discovered on a survey trap in west central La Crosse County, about a mile east of the La Crosse city limit in the Town of Medary. The adult insects were discovered by a DATCP EAB trapper during routine trap inspection and end-of-season trap removal. The specimens were sent to federal identifiers and subsequently confirmed as EAB on Friday, August 19, 2011.

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