Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The brown marmorated stink bug, is a plant pest that was recently introduced into the United States from its native range in Japan, Korea, and China. Reported host plants in the United States include the following: fruit crops, agronomic crops, vegetable crops, ornamental trees and shrubs. For more information, please click “read more”.

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Training and Pruning Apple Trees

Apples are the most common fruit tree planted in Wisconsin. In addition to providing fruit, apple trees can be a pleasing addition to the home landscape. However, unlike most shade trees, apple trees require annual training and pruning from the time of planting to produce an attractive and productive tree. To learn about the care of apple trees, please click “read more”.

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Winter Salt Injury and Salt Tolerant Landscape Plants

Winter in Wisconsin often means snow and ice. To allow safe travel for pedestrians and motorists, walkways and roads must be kept as ice-free as possible. While snow and ice removal is best done with shovels, snow blowers, and plows, this may not remove all of the snow, and ice can quickly form, leaving slick, hazardous surfaces. Deicing salts are used extensively to melt this ice and snow. To read the entire article, please click “read more”.

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Hands on Gardening- Earwigs

Watch this week’s Hands on Gardening to learn what you can do to get earwigs out of your garden and home. To view this episode, click “read more”.

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Promethea Moth

Promethea Moth

This moth has a wing spread of 2.5 to four inches, the females averaging a little larger than the males. The female promethea resembles the cecropia to some extent although it is much smaller. Both have an eye spot near the tip of the front wing and a white mark near the middle of each wing. However, the female promethea is a richer red-brown than the cecropia; the male promethea is dark brown to nearly black and lacks the white marks. The male also has the unusual habit, for a saturniid, of flying in the late afternoon. The rest of the saturniids are only active after dark. To view the full publication, click “read more”.

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